Nuevo Latino Cuisine: Culinary Artistry, Community and Conversation

May 9 from Noon – 5 pm
Location: Putah Creek Lodge, UC Davis

This library/academic convivium features presentations by three internationally known speakers, Ken Albala, Steve Sando, and, Leopoldo López Gil on Latin American food, its roots and its modern interpretations. Fee includes lunch.

On May 9th, 2011, the UC Davis Library will host “Nuevo Latino Cuisine: Culinary Artistry, Community and Conversation.” This fee-based library/academic convivium features presentations by three internationally known speakers:

• Ken Albala, a noted food historian, faculty member at the University of the Pacific and prolific author and editor of publications that include Eating Right in the Renaissance and A Cultural History of Food, will speak on “The Roots of Latin American Food.”

Steve Sando, owner of Rancho Gordo: New World Specialty Food, culinary consultant and author of Heirloom Beans, will discuss “Redefining the New American Kitchen: Bringing Latin American Heirloom Ingredients to the Modern Table”.

• Leopoldo López Gil, a founding member of the Slow Food Movement in Venezuela; President, the Academia Venezolana de Gastronomía; and restaurateur. Señor López will talk about the “new modern Latin cuisine” and the ingredients and culinary traditions that encourage chefs and serious home cooks to experiment and create new fusion dishes. A book signing will follow the presentations.

Location: Putah Creek Lodge, University of California, Davis

Time: 12Noon – 5PM, Monday, May 9th, 2011
Cost: $50, includes lunch and presentations
Registration forms:

The convivium is accompanied by a Shields Library lobby exhibit, “Nuevo Latino Cuisine: Culinary Art, Community and Conversation” :

Contact: Myra Appel,, for additional information.

Greenpeace: Co-op exemplifies sustainable seafood

sustainable seafoodby Brandon Darnell
Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op is the best place in the state to purchase sustainable seafood, and No. 2 in the nation, according to Greenpeace.

“(The co-op) is one of those great stores that has taken amazing steps in realizing that sustainable seafood is incredibly important,” said Casson Trenor, seafood campaigner for Greenpeace.

Greenpeace ranks the 20 biggest grocery store chains on how sustainable their seafood is, and Trenor said some smaller grocers are included as well due to their commitment to ensuring seafood is sustainable.

Read more »

President’s Message

I spent a day on a garbage truck recently…the result of a winning bid at a live auction fundraiser. Watching all the trash we discard, I realized that eating the Slow Food way greatly minimizes the amount of waste we discard. Food packaging makes up about 32% of household waste in the U.S., according to Earth911. Shopping at the farmers market (or growing your own) means little packaging and fresher produce so you throw away less spoiled food.

Limiting our reliance on convenience foods and fast food, with their abundance of packaging, greatly reduces the trash we send to the landfill. Shopping at the bulk aisle allows you to reuse your plastic bags or bring your own containers. The Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op will weigh your empty containers and mark them with a tare weight so you can completely eliminate packages and bags. I buy my spices, oatmeal, peanut butter, powdered milk, flour and dried
beans in the bulk aisle. The name of the game is pre-cycling (choosing products with eco-friendly or no packaging), which provides on the best method of reducing the amount of waste we generate.

Karen Auwaerter
President, Slow Food Sacramento

Sacramento schools aim to serve healthier food

By Gina Kim
Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011

It wasn’t technically a corn dog Julie Raymond’s kids reported was being served for breakfast at Leonardo da Vinci K-8 School last year.

It was actually a pancake-encased sausage on a stick.

But the skewered sustenance was equally egregious in the eyes of Raymond and her husband, Jonathan, who happens to be superintendent of the Sacramento City Unified School District.

Since the April launch of the Healthy Foods Task Force to rethink what the district feeds its 47,000 students, there have been successes: Every school will have a salad bar by the end of the year, fruit carts are selling strawberries, grapes and pineapple slices as snacks at the larger high schools, and a handful of farmers are supplying produce directly to the district. Read more »


Crocker Café

216 O Street, Sacramento, CA 95814  •  (916) 808-7000   •




2711 Riverside Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95818  •  (916) 443-8929   •




1615 J Street, Sacramento 95814  •  (916) 669-5300   •




2381 Fair Oaks Blvd., Sacramento, 95825  •  (916) 489-2000   •


Capay Valley farmers create a marketplace

Capay Valley farmers marketBy Gina Kim

Friday Jan. 14, 2011

Lindsey Armeen bypasses the goldfish crackers, M&Ms and yogurt-covered pretzels in the free employee snack rooms at IDEO, a Palo Alto-based design consultant company.

OK, maybe she’ll have a couple peanut M&Ms.

But usually the support coordinator will reach for the piles of fruit grown just 125 miles north in the Capay Valley – a pink lady apple from Manas Ranch, a Satsuma mandarin from Gold Oak Ranch, carrots from Full Belly Farm.

About 30 growers and ranchers from the Yolo County region have banded together to sell their wares as the Capay Valley Farm Shop. In that way, they’re circumventing distributors that won’t deal with small farms while they become cumulatively large enough to fill big orders. Read more »