Slow Food Sacramento

A Chapter of Slow Food USA

Browsing Posts published by Slow Food Sacramento

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Ark of Taste Proposal: Chenin Blanc, Clarksburg AVA  It is widely known that 3 regions produce the finest Chenin Blanc: 1) the Loire Valley in Northern France, 2) South Africa, and 3) Clarksburg, California. This often maligned grape is now being ripped out, and replaced with our new favorite varietal, Chardonnay. Darrell Corti acknowledges the unique character of Chenin Blanc from Clarksburg.

Slow Food Committee

Join this committee to gather information and resources to file proposal for Slow Food Ark of Taste.  Desired completion of proposal in advance of Mr. Croce’s visit.  Please contact David Baker (GRASacramento@gmail.com) if you are interested in participating in this committee, which may include vineyard visits and sampling of local and imported chenin blancs.

http://www.slowfoodusa.org/index.php/programs/details/ark_of_taste/

http://www.digitalinevitable.net/chenin/

Dan Charles
July 15, 2011

The town of Hardwick, Vt., has been celebrated as the scene of a local food revival. In recent years, lots of small farms have started up nearby.

Tom Stearns, president of a local organic seed company called High Mowing Seeds, says there are more organic farms per capita within 10 miles of Hardwick than anywhere else in the world. There’s also a thriving local grocery co-op; a busy farmer’s market; even a classy restaurant — Claire’s — where almost anything you eat grew or grazed on land nearby.

Read more »

As the new SFUSA Governor for the Central Valley Region I will work to strengthen our regional network of Slow Food Chapters and to share information about activities of interest up and down the Valley. (Who knew that Stanislaus County is the nation’s sweet potato capital?) I hope we will join forces to host some multi-chapter events and look forward to visiting our counterpart leaders from Shasta to Madera County.

And I anticipate that forging relationships with California’s other three governors and the governors across the country will bring loads of ideas and energy to our efforts to promote good, clean, fair food for all. I’ve already learned that Slow Food Sacramento is a standout chapter in this region and state. I’ll point SFUSA our way when they are looking for replicable models and best practices for other chapters. I’ve also learned that I’ll be the main connector between the region’s chapters and SFUSA. I welcome your suggestions and counsel.

On a more personal note, we recently hosted an organic farmer from Japan, seeking refuge in California from the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster. Read about it here.

Charity Kenyon
charity@slowfoodsacramento.com

18 we hosted our Third Annual Urban Ag Fest attended by 130 friends of Slow Food Sacramento. The event was on the lawn at the old Army Depot right next to the new garden we installed for Plates Café and Catering, a project of St. John’s Shelter for Women and Children. Sunny and breezy weather made this the perfect setting for learning about urban beekeeping, edible landscaping, chicken keeping, food preserving and more.
View the photos »

Everyone was pleased to see real progress on the garden, which was constructed by Bill Maynard of the Sacramento Community Garden Coalition with the help of volunteers from Slow Food Sacramento and St. John’s Shelter. Spring Warren’s talk was inspiring and many of us took home a signed copy of her Quarter Acre Farm. The food, supervised by Bobbin Mulvaney and made and served by Plates’ volunteer learners was delicious and plentiful. And the auction items were irresistible. We raised over $10,000 for the garden and introduced lots of new fans to the great café at Plates—open Monday through Friday 11-2. Visit and enjoy!

Marion Nestle
Sunday, July 3, 2011

Q: I know you say “vote with your fork,” and I do, as often as possible, but it seems so small a gesture. In what other ways can we, as consumers, speak out or act to change our food system?

A: Vote with your fork and vote with your vote. Today’s food movement gives you plenty of opportunity to do both. Voting with your fork means buying and eating according to what you believe is right, at least to the extent you can.

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By Mark Bittman
Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Mass-produced tomatoes have become redder, more tender and slightly more flavorful than the crunchy orange “cello-wrapped” specimens of a couple of decades ago, but the lives of the workers who grow and pick them haven’t improved much since Edward R. Murrow’s revealing and deservedly famous Harvest of Shame report of 1960, which contained the infamous quote, “We used to own our slaves; now we just rent them.”

But bit by bit things have improved some, a story that’s told in detail and with insight and compassion by Barry Estabrook in his new book, “Tomatoland.” We can actually help them improve further.

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By Gina Kim
Sunday, May. 29, 2011

Gleaming stainless steel dominates the long-abandoned fertilizer and supply store along Highway 16, just before the road bends into the dusty town of Esparto.

Meat cases have been cleaned, shelving installed and rails – strong enough to support 800-pound carcasses hanging from the ceiling – line the labyrinth of sterile rooms.

Required inspections are all that’s left to make the Manas Ranch Old-Style Custom Meat Market the only USDA-inspected meat processor within a 100-mile radius when it opens in June, said owner Fred Manas.

“We will be able to ship our meat anywhere in the U.S.,” said Manas, who raises 100 Angus-Hereford grain-finished cows without hormones or antibiotics. “We will be able to sell our meat directly to customers.”

The market will process the beef Manas raises, meat raised by pig, lamb and goat farmers throughout the region and wild game bagged by hunters.

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May 9 from Noon – 5 pm
Location: Putah Creek Lodge, UC Davis

This library/academic convivium features presentations by three internationally known speakers, Ken Albala, Steve Sando, and, Leopoldo López Gil on Latin American food, its roots and its modern interpretations. Fee includes lunch.

On May 9th, 2011, the UC Davis Library will host “Nuevo Latino Cuisine: Culinary Artistry, Community and Conversation.” This fee-based library/academic convivium features presentations by three internationally known speakers:

• Ken Albala, a noted food historian, faculty member at the University of the Pacific and prolific author and editor of publications that include Eating Right in the Renaissance and A Cultural History of Food, will speak on “The Roots of Latin American Food.”

Steve Sando, owner of Rancho Gordo: New World Specialty Food, culinary consultant and author of Heirloom Beans, will discuss “Redefining the New American Kitchen: Bringing Latin American Heirloom Ingredients to the Modern Table”.

• Leopoldo López Gil, a founding member of the Slow Food Movement in Venezuela; President, the Academia Venezolana de Gastronomía; and restaurateur. Señor López will talk about the “new modern Latin cuisine” and the ingredients and culinary traditions that encourage chefs and serious home cooks to experiment and create new fusion dishes. A book signing will follow the presentations.

Location: Putah Creek Lodge, University of California, Davis

Time: 12Noon – 5PM, Monday, May 9th, 2011
Cost: $50, includes lunch and presentations
Registration forms: http://www.lib.ucdavis.edu/ul/events/nuevo-latino-cuisine/nlc-registration.pdf

The convivium is accompanied by a Shields Library lobby exhibit, “Nuevo Latino Cuisine: Culinary Art, Community and Conversation” : http://www.lib.ucdavis.edu/ul/about/exhibits/?item=nuevolatinocuisine

Contact: Myra Appel, mlappel@lib.ucdavis.edu, for additional information.