Slow Food Sacramento

A Chapter of Slow Food USA

Browsing Posts published by Slow Food Sacramento

As Congress returns post-election, they’ll have an improved Child Nutrition Act sitting on their desk – one that gives more money for each meal, supports farm-to-table programs, and kicks junk food out of schools. Click here to tell them to pass it now.

Today 32 million children will line up in school cafeterias across the nation. Right now, underfunding means that the people filling our kids’ trays have no choice but to do it with food that will lead to one in three of those children contracting diabetes.

It’s time to serve our kids a better deal.

The Child Nutrition Act Congress has before it is far from perfect, but it contains the first real increase to school lunch funding in the entire 44 year history of the legislation. That is an amazing achievement for all of us who’ve pushed this hard for so long.

But if we have any hope for getting real, nutritious food on school menus, we have to let Congress know that we want the Act passed now, not later, and we want the flaws in this bill – the funding taken from food stamps – fixed before the end of the year.

Your message could literally make the difference – and is the last chance for this Congress to deliver healthy lunch to our kids.

So far on this ‘Time For Lunch’ campaign, our community has sent over 100,000 emails, made countless phone calls to Congress, and 20,000 of us gathered for an ‘Eat-In’ all over the country. Now it’s time to seal the deal, and for Congress to deliver our children this historic legislation.

Thanks for making it Time For Lunch,
Jerusha, for the Slow Food USA Team

PS – Other than inflationary increases, Congress has never raised the level of funding for the food our children eat at school. Let’s make sure this Congress passes the historic Child Nutrition Act, and delivers America’s children the nutrition they deserve.

By Carlos Alcalá
Monday, Nov. 22, 2010

The authors of the first-ever “Field Guide to California Agriculture” want people to think about where their food is coming from – and to think about it in new ways.

The guide, recently published by the University of California Press, opens with something that looks little like a field guide and nothing like agriculture.

A two-page spread shortly after the table of contents looks like nothing so much as an array of paint chips.

The grid of 160 little colored squares begins with what looks like an amethyst purple and ends with school-bus yellow.

The text on the following two pages reveals that it is the “Colors of California Agriculture,” ranging alphabetically from Alfalfa Flower (the amethyst) to Zucchini Blossom (the yellow. Read more »

by Erica Reder

Last year, City Slicker Farms grew and distributed almost 7,000 pounds of pay-what-you-can produce in West Oakland. That number may double in coming years, thanks to a $4 million grant the nonprofit won last week. Awarded through Proposition 84, a 2006 initiative that approved bonds for environmental projects throughout the state, the money will allow City Slicker Farms to purchase and develop 1.4 acres of land into a neighborhood farm and park.

The new project will both increase affordable fresh food in West Oakland and, says Executive Director Barbara Finnin, “help legitimize this kind of work in urban agriculture.” Read more »

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By Lisa Abend
Friday, October 29th, 2010

At midday on Oct. 23, some 300 young people sat down to eat in a shopping mall in Turin, Italy. But instead of the usual food-court fare of burgers and Cinnabons, lunch for these mostly 20-somethings consisted of rice-and-broccoli salad, stewed sweet potatoes and hand-chopped beef tartare — all of it served on recyclable paper plates draped with raw kale leaves. If that seems a surprisingly wholesome meal for the setting, that’s kind of the point: the “eat-in,” organized by the Youth Food Movement — an arm of the Slow Food organization — was devised in part as a protest against fast food. “By doing this and by making Slow Food work, we’re saying no to the industrial food that most people are forced to eat,” says Gabriel Vidolin, a 21-year-old Brazilian chef who helped prepare the meal… Read more »

By Rick Kushman
Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

For some people, this won’t be the most appetizing symbol, but lots of Sacramento restaurants are happy to earn a snail.

Specifically, a Snail of Approval from Slow Food Sacramento – see, snails are very, very slooooow so, uh, you get it – and this week the local group took the program out of its shell and awarded Snails to 13 area restaurants.

Is this a big deal? I’m saying yes. It shows both the growth of the Slow Food movement in this region and the growing sophistication of the local dining scene. Plus, you have to admit, the name is kind of cute… Read more »