The Slow Food Sacramento Book Club is a book club for readers who enjoy food-related literature, both non-fiction and fiction. The club meets at 6:30 pm on the second Thursday of every other month at one of our member’s homes. Everyone who attends brings an appetizer to share, and we enjoy an evening of lively literary discussion. At the close of each meeting we choose our next book based on recommendations from our members. New members are always welcome!

If you are interested in participating or if you would like more information, please contact Kathleen Albiani at katonthyme@gmail.com.

Next meeting: August 14th at 6:30 pm

A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table by Molly Wizenberg “In A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table, Molly Wizenberg recounts a life with the kitchen at its center. From her mother’s pound cake, a staple of summer picnics during her childhood in Oklahoma, to the eggs she cooked for her father during the weeks before his death, food and memories are intimately entwined. You won’t be able to decide whether to curl up and sink into the story or to head straight to the market to fill your basket with ingredients for Cider-Glazed Salmon and Pistachio Cake with Honeyed Apricots.”

Upcoming Book Club Reads:

October: Day of Honey: A Memoir of Food, Love, and War by Annia Ciezadlo

“In the fall of 2003, as Iraq descended into civil war, Annia Ciezadlo spent her honeymoon in Baghdad. For the next six years, she lived in Baghdad and Beirut, where she dodged bullets during sectarian street battles, chronicled the Arab world’s first peaceful revolution, and watched Hezbollah commandos invade her Beirut neighborhood. Throughout all of it, she broke bread with Sunnis and Shiites, warlords and refugees, matriarchs and mullahs. Day of Honey is her story of the hunger for food and friendship during wartime—a communion that feeds the soul as much as the body.”

 

December: Fruits of Victory: The Woman’s Land Army of America in the Great War by Elaine F. Weiss

 “From 1917 to 1920 the Woman’s Land Army (WLA) brought thousands of city workers, society women, artists, business professionals, and college students into rural America to take over the farm work after men were called to wartime service. These women wore military-style uniforms, lived in communal camps, and did what was considered “men’s work”—that is, plowing fields, driving tractors, planting, harvesting, and hauling lumber. The Land Army insisted its “farmerettes” be paid wages equal to male farm laborers and be protected by an eight-hour workday…”

 

February: Anecdotes of Destiny and Ehrengard (fiction)by Isak Dinesen

“In the classic “Babette’s Feast,” a mysterious Frenchwoman prepares a sumptuous feast for a gathering of religious ascetics and, in doing so, introduces them to the true essence of grace. In “The Immortal Story,” a miserly old tea-trader living in Canton wishes for power and finds redemption as he turns an oft-told sailors’ tale into reality for a young man and woman. And in the magnificent novella Ehrengard, Dinesen tells of the powerful yet restrained rapport between a noble Wagnerian beauty and a rakish artist. Hauntingly evoked and sensuously realized, the five stories read and novella collected here have the hold of ‘fairy stories read in childhood . . . of dreams . . . and of our life as dreams’ (The New York Times).”

 

April: The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food by Thomas McNamee

“In 1957, America was a gastronomic wasteland. One man changed all that.

From his perch at the New York Times, Craig Claiborne led America’s food revolution. He took readers where they had never been before, and brought Julia Child and Jacques Pépin to national acclaim. He introduced us to the foods and tools we take for granted today, from crème fraîche and balsamic vinegar to arugula and the salad spinner. And he turned dinner into an event—dining out, delighting your friends, or simply cooking for your family. But the passionate gastronome led a conflicted personal life. Forced to mask his sexuality, he was imprisoned in solitude and searched for stable and lasting love…”