Slow Food Sacramento

A Chapter of Slow Food USA

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Staring at a future of lower corn prices and higher inputs, Huegerich decided to experiment. Two years ago, he planted 320 acres of conventional corn and 1,700 with GMO corn. To his delight, the conventional fields yielded 15 to 30 more bushels per acre than the GMO fields, with a profit margin of up to $100 more per acre. And so in 2013, he upped the ante, ordering six varieties of conventional seeds for close to 750 acres and GMOs for his remaining acres.

Governor’s + Region Report –

Slow Food Sacramento’s successful membership drive has earned the chapter a visit — and meal prepared by — Matt Jones, the newly elected President of the Slow Food USA Board of Directors. Congratulations! Still haven’t joined? We’re hoping to sign up just as many new and renewing members by the end of the year. Consider a gift membership — it’s easy to arrange.

As we go into end of the year harvest celebrations, we’re focusing on the Slow Food Biodiversity Foundation’s Ark of Taste project — the FAO-recognized effort to save delicious foods and meaningful food cultures from extinction. Read more about Slow Food Sacramento’s celebration of Ark products elsewhere in this newsletter. And thank Snail of Approval Awardees including Elegant Beans/Mohr-Frye Ranch and Kingbird Farms for growing several Ark varieties of beans, fruits, and vegetables. Then take a moment to notice that Snail of Approval Restaurant Magpie Café & Catering notes on its menu when it serves AOT foods. In 2014, the 25th Anniversary of Slow Food, let’s celebrate the farmers and chefs who are rescuing these foods. And let’s identify and nominate more candidates for the Ark. The Karakul or Fat-tailed sheep, raised at Oregon House in Yuba County, has just been boarded. Spring lamb anyone? Our chapter nomination, Chenin Blanc Clarksburg AVA is being reviewed. Want to join the Slow Food California Ark of Taste Committee? Email charity@slowfoodsacramento.com

The Slow Food California Regional Leaders meeting in San Diego November 2-3 gathered over 50 leaders from across the state as well as Executive Director Richard McCarthy and Jovan Sage and Isabel Eljaiek from the Brooklyn staff as well as Matt Jones of the Board of Directors, plus Alfonso Rocha from Puebla, Mexico (International Councilor representing Mexico and Central America) and representatives of Slow Food Baja. Our focus was on what it means to be a region within Slow Food USA and what big ideas we have for the California region. Our Policy and Ark of Taste Committees are up and running. We formed new committees on Transnational work within the Americas and on Snail of Approval as well as for a series of Master Classes — Master of Meat? Wine? Cheese? – patterned after a very successful Slow Food Italy program. More coming soon, including how to volunteer and opportunities for training. Our policy, ark of taste, events, and fundraising workshops were terrific. And we know we need to spread these opportunities around the state. Best part – meeting all these energetic, interesting, involved volunteers, farmers, chefs, educators, gardeners, and you!

Next up for a regional meeting is Sacramento in connection with the Green Schools National Conference March 27-29, 2014. Stay tuned.

Charity Kenyon
Slow Food USA Governor
Central Valley California Region &
International Councilor
charity@slowfoodsacramento.com

 

 

What’s next as Sacramento seeks to earn and hold on to its title as America’s Farm To Fork Capital? Some interesting ideas collected by Chris Macias in The Sacramento Bee: http://www.sacbee.com/2013/10/30/5860288/growing-sacramentos-farm-to-fork.html

Fourteen local businesses recently received the Snail of Approval award from Slow Food Sacramento, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting good, clean and fair food.

The Snail of Approval program is designed to recognize local busineses that contribute to the quality, authenticity and sustainability of food in the Sacramento community. The Snail of Approval is granted based on the three basic principles of the Slow Food movement: good (authentic flavor), clean (grown and produced so it does not harm the environment) and fair (food producers receive fair compensation).

Businesses are recognized in three categories: Producers, Supporters, and Restaurants. The businesses receiving the Snail of Approval this year are:

 

Producers

Elegant Beans and Beyond

Doughbot

Chocolate Fish Coffee

Temple Coffee Roasters

Insight Coffee Roasters

The Good Stuff

Kingbird Farm

 

Restaurants

Thir13en

Yellowbill

Capitol Garage

Mama Kim’s on the Go

 

Supporters

Two Flew the Coop

Edible Sacramento

Local Roots Food Tours

 

The awards will be presented on Sunday, November 3, at the annual Harvest Dinner. For more details on the event, please visit https://slowfoodharvestdinner2013.eventbrite.com/.

 

For more information about the Snail of Approval program, visit http://slowfoodsacramento.com/snail-of-approval/about/.

 

 

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Slow Food Sacramento is the local chapter of the international nonprofit Slow Food, which has more than 100,000 members worldwide. Slow Food believes that the food we eat should taste good: that it should be produced in a clean way that does not harm the environment, animal welfare or our health; and that food producers should receive fair compensation for their work.

Slow Food considers its members and all who eat to be co-producers, not consumers, of food. By being informed about how our food is produced and actively supporting those who produce it, we become a part of and a partner in the production process.