Slow Food Sacramento

A Chapter of Slow Food USA

Browsing Posts in News

by Rick Kushman
Wednesday, June 23 2010

One of the good things about the Sacramento restaurant community is that it really is a community. And the cooperative spirit is showing up in that most elegant of items: compost.

I know. How romantic. It’s why people go to culinary school.

Seriously, what makes this a cool story is that 10 of the big-name restaurants on the local scene have joined in a handful of environmental programs, and the biggest effort – the composting project – wouldn’t have worked without most of them playing along.

That’s because to make compost, you need a certain amount of, you know, garbage.

And not just any garbage. We’ll get to that… Read more »

The Food Movement, Rising
by Michael Pollan
June 1, 2010

It might sound odd to say this about something people deal with at least three times a day, but food in America has been more or less invisible, politically speaking, until very recently. At least until the early 1970s, when a bout of food price inflation and the appearance of books critical of industrial agriculture (by Wendell Berry, Francis Moore Lappé, and Barry Commoner, among others) threatened to propel the subject to the top of the national agenda, Americans have not had to think very hard about where their food comes from, or what it is doing to the planet, their bodies, and their society.

Most people count this a blessing. Americans spend a smaller percentage of their income on food than any people in history—slightly less than 10 percent—and a smaller amount of their time preparing it: a mere thirty-one minutes a day on average, including clean-up… Read more »

Published Monday, May. 17, 2010

The peeling paint, chain-link fences and abandoned lots in central Oak Park belie what’s beyond a modern wood fence at the end of a driveway on Seventh Avenue.

Through the gate is a backyard oasis where two rows of seed potatoes have just been nestled into the ground. Sage, oregano and thyme grow in pots. And a two-story chicken coop houses five hens who don’t seem to mind that their eggs continually disappear.

This is the yard of Paul Towers, state director of the nonprofit Pesticide Watch, illicit chicken owner and grass-roots activist who believes everyone should be able to eat fresh food and drink clean water… Read more »