By Lisa Abend
Friday, October 29th, 2010

At midday on Oct. 23, some 300 young people sat down to eat in a shopping mall in Turin, Italy. But instead of the usual food-court fare of burgers and Cinnabons, lunch for these mostly 20-somethings consisted of rice-and-broccoli salad, stewed sweet potatoes and hand-chopped beef tartare — all of it served on recyclable paper plates draped with raw kale leaves. If that seems a surprisingly wholesome meal for the setting, that’s kind of the point: the “eat-in,” organized by the Youth Food Movement — an arm of the Slow Food organization — was devised in part as a protest against fast food. “By doing this and by making Slow Food work, we’re saying no to the industrial food that most people are forced to eat,” says Gabriel Vidolin, a 21-year-old Brazilian chef who helped prepare the meal… Read more »